Questioning Techniques: Types of Questions

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Hi Everyone,

Here is an article that demonstrates the significance of proper questioning techniques and how as  learning facilitators we can use this technique to foster learning … Here is the link

http://www.google.ca/#gs_rn=15&gs_ri=psy-ab&suggest=p&cp=13&gs_id=1f&xhr=t&q=questioning+techniques&es_nrs=true&pf=p&output=search&sclient=psy-ab&oq=questioning+t&gs_l=&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_cp.r_qf.&bvm=bv.47380653,d.cGE&fp=5e7eb439a8fb9c76&biw=695&bih=603 ( I am having trouble finding the direct link-so this one takes you to the google search and its the 2nd article that pops up from the top-lable “Questioning Techniques:  Types of Questions”

Questioning Techniques: Types of Questions

“Teachers’ skill in questioning and in leading discussions is valuable for many instructional purposes, eliciting student reflection and challenging deeper student engagement” (Danielson, 1996, p. 92).

Unskilled questioning focuses on “rapid-fire, short-answer, low-level questions” as vehicles for checking students’ knowledge. Danielson calls this “’recitation’ rather than ‘discussion’, because the questions are not true questions but rather a form of a quiz in which teachers elicit from students their knowledge on a particular topic. …poor questions…are boring, comprehensible to only a few students, or narrow—the teacher has a single answer in mind even when choices are possible” (p. 92).

Skilled questioning engages students in a true exploration of content. When they are carefully crafted and framed, questions “enable students to reflect on their understanding and consider new possibilities.” Students are allowed “think time” before responses are expected and teachers often “probe a student’s answer, seeking clarification or elaboration through such questions as, ‘Could you give an example of…?’ or ‘Would you explain what you mean?’

Additionally, well- led classroom discussions are animated and they engage all students in important questions to extend, not just recall, knowledge. In well- run discussions, teachers serve as “guides on the side,” encouraging students to take center stage, comment on others’ responses and request further explanations; the teacher sets the stage, while students are expected to assume considerable responsibility for the depth and breadth of discussions. Everyone participates, not just the “few star students.” The teacher is not waiting for “the right answer.” Well-run discussions also encourage students to pose questions. Where this happens, teachers are encouraging students to develop critical and creative thinking skills and to engage in analytical thinking; students often engage more deeply and are more motivated to participate when they are encouraged to be the questioners. In this type of discussion, “the perspectives of all students are sought; all voices are heard.”

Even the best-planned and -run discussions may go off on an occasional tangent. To maintain a thought-provoking, focused discussion, the teacher needs to be able to find a respectful way to bring the group back to task without cutting off or putting down those who are off track.

Danielson’s “take” on the quality of questions, discussion techniques, and student participation from the perspective of the level of performance in the classroom follows (p. 94):

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ELEMENT

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LEVEL OF PERFORMANCE

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UNSATISFACTORY

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BASIC

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PROFICIENT

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DISTINGUISHED

Quality of questions

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Teacher’s questions are poor

Some of the teacher’s questions are low, some high quality; only some invite a response

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Most questions are high quality. Adequate time “thought time” is available

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Questions are uniformly high quality, with adequate “thought time” built in. Students formulate many questions.

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Discussion techniques

Interaction between instructor and students is primarily “recitation” style; teacher mediates all questions and responses

Teacher makes some attempt to engage students in meaningful discussion, with uneven results

Classroom interaction represents true discussion, with teacher stepping, when appropriate, to the side

Students assume considerable responsibility for the success of the discussion, initiating topics and making unsolicited contributions

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Student participation

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Only a few students participate

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Teacher attempts to engage all students, but with only limited success

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Teacher successfully engages all students

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Students themselves ensure that all voices are heard in the discussion

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You may want to visit some or all of these Web sites:

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Cheers,

V

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